Posts Tagged: Steven J. Deidel

Happiness Is A Warm Gun

 

Happiness is a Warm Gun opening 10 October running through 13 December

Happiness is a Warm Gun
Opening 10 October running through 13 December 2014.


10 October – 13 December 2014

The LIDA Project is currently in the process of devising six unique, interconnected stories challenging perceptions of what a gun is and how firearms play a role in U.S. culture. This work will revisit our ‘home’ (last seen with Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep) format bringing these works site specifically into private residences.

Happiness is a Warm Gun is a six-part performance exploration of gun culture and violence in the United States. Each piece deconstructs the American gun debate and examines the statement, “Guns don’t kill people, people kill people.” From freedom to fear our complex relationship with firearms, and the role they play in our society, is one of the most polarizing issues of our  generation. From the inside it has become a cornerstone of the ideological “Culture War” with players on both sides staking uncompromising positions, making broad claims and dehumanizing anyone who may disagree with their perspective. From the outside it looks like a high-stakes game being played by people with endless resources, who play loose with the rules and only let you play if you buy into their brand.

It is a game.

A trivial pursuit where we chase one another around in circles gathering facts and assembling parts and pieces in a race to win the grand prize- the right to call our opponent wrong. The right to call ourselves true american.

This is where the LIDA Project’s exploration begins. With a circle…


Part I: Sports & Leisure
Directed by Carol Bloom
Performances by Tyler Compton, Anita Harkess, Ben Turk, & Madison Ritter.

Three combat veterans from different eras find themselves in a hunting blind, lost to time, searching for meaning in their sacrifice.

Performance Dates: October 10 & 30  //  November 6, 15, 22, & 28  //  December 6  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part I »

 


Part II: Arts & Literature
Directed by Nancy Flanagan
Performances by Dell Domnik, Caty Herrick, Iona Leighton, & J. Edward Nelson.

A couple sits down for a weekly game of Scrabble and their word play reveals a violent side of the relationship.

Performance Dates: October 11 & 30  //  November 6, 15, 22, & 28  //  December 6  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part II »

 


Part III: Entertainment
Directed by Sinjin Jones
Performances by Tyler Compton, Caty Herrick, Ren Kolozak, & Madison Ritter.

People are unwitting participants in a game show where they must agree on a series of statements in order to win the game. If they can’t agree on a solution, the audience will decide their fate!

Performance Dates: October 17 & 31  //  November 7, 13, 20, & 29 (at 2:00pm)  //  December 5  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part III »

 


Part IV: Science & Nature
Directed by Erica Kae
Performances by Kenneth Berba, Anita Harkess, Iona Leighton, & Ben Turk.

A young person suffering from depression and diagnosed with schizophrenia has a conversation with his guns about his diagnosis. Told from the perspective of the machines.

Performance Dates: October 18 & 31  //  November 7, 20, & 29 (at 2:00pm)  //  December 5  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part VI »

 


Part V: Geography
Directed by Kenny Storms
Performances by Caty Herrick, Erika Kae, & Ben Turk.

Inspired by the Dr. Seuss short story, “The Zaxs”, this story considers the moral implications for a society that chooses intransigence over change.

Performance Dates: October 24  //  November 1, 8, 14, 21, & 29  //  December 4  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part V »

 


Part VI: History
Directed by Robin Davies
Performances by Dell Domnik, Anita Harkess, & J. Edward Nelson.

This experiment explores the history and ideologies at the center of the gun debate.

Performance Dates: October 24  //  November 1, 8, 14, 21, & 29  //  December 4  (All performances at 8:00pm)
Buy Tickets for Part VI »

 


 

Ludlow, 1914 (a dramatic vaudeville)

Ludlow, 1914 (a dramatic vaudeville)
Terry Burnsed, Bruce Carter, Margaret Kasahara & Jeremiah Walter. Photo Jeff Kearney (2014).

Returning for a limited run at the LIDA Project’s work|space in late Spring 2015. 

It was shocking, momentous and then largely forgotten. Two dozen people were killed, including 2 women and 11 children. The Ludlow Massacre of 1914 was the most violent episode in the Colorado coal wars, which in turn was part of the deadliest strike in the history of the United States.  This post-contemporary production deconstructs the Ludlow Massacre along with contemporary issues of labor and inequality. This wild examination on the centenary of the events, creates the opportunity for audiences to explore social issues through context, both local and global.


Media Coverage

Review:Theatreworks and LIDA Project Explore the Forgotten History of LUDLOW, 1914

In a unique new collaboration, Ludlow, 1914 recreates the deadly labor struggle

 

 

R.U.R. / lol

R.U.R./lol

R.U.R./lol

Production History
15 February – 2 March 2013 ( work|space, Denver, CO)

Part text. Part noise. Part sound. Part image. All Robot.

R.U.R./lol, an original work loosely based on the 1920 Czech science-fiction play Rossum’s Universal Robots. At the end of humanity four robots remain. Through their controllers they work to protect what remains of the planet from a catastrophic event. The process leads them to question how we came to this end.

Direction by Lorenzo Sariñana
Production Design by Steven J. Deidel

Ensemble: Rhea Amos / Hart DeRose / Laura Lounge / Heidi Pachner
Controllers: Kenrick Fisher / Brian Freeland / Dustin Lacy / David Lafont / Tommy Sheridan


Media Coverage

Westword: LIDA Project’s R.U.R./lol uses robots to examine what it means to be human

Culture West’s Photo Essay: My Night at LIDA Project’s ‘R.U.R./lol’ 


Images

  • R.U.R./lol
    R.U.R./lol
  • R.U.R./lol
    R.U.R./lol
  • R.U.R./lol
    R.U.R./lol
  • R.U.R./lol
    R.U.R./lol

 

 

Add It Up

14 September – 6 October 2012

An original interpretation by The LIDA Project inspired by the work of Elmer Rice’s 1924 drama, The Adding Machine.

* Add It Up is a remix of the 1924 Elmer Rice play The Adding Machine as interpreted by six sound, video, and performance artists from The LIDA Project.

It is sound. It is light. It is music. It is words. It is images. It is machines. It is humans. It is about love. And hate. And murder. And death. And rebirth. And dancing. And eggs.


Press

Everything adds up as the LIDA Project embarks on its 18th season


The Company

Ensemble
Hart DeRose: Zero
Michelle Hurtubise: Elmer Rice
Heidi Pachner: The Boss
Lorenzo Sariñana: Daisy
Matthew Schultz: Mrs. Zero

Producer
Steven J. Deidel

Direction
Brian Freeland

Assistant Direction
Rhea Amos

Lighting Design
Steven J. Deidel / The LIDA Project

Sound Design
Lorenzo Sariñana / The LIDA Project

Costumes
Hart Derose / The LIDA Project

Projection Design
Brian Freeland / The LIDA Project

 

Auto da Fé

11 May – 2 June 2012

An original adaptation of the book by Elias Canetti by Rebecca Gorman O’Neill. Directed by Brian Freeland.

A twisted creation developed by The LIDA Project ensemble, playwright Rebecca Gorman, and director Brian Freeland. Manipulations of darkness and light and juxtapositions of ghastly imagery help to re-imagine Canetti’s breakthrough 1935 work about a lone recluse and his infinite library of books.

“A warning against the idea that ‘rigid, dissociated intellectualism and detached, dogmatic scholarship can prevail over evil, chaos, and destruction‘.” – Lisa Hill

Auto da Fé

Auto da Fé

Justin Bieber Meets Al Qaeda

September 9 – October 8, 2011
Devised by The LIDA Project

This original LIDA collaborative work inspired by Max Fritch’s The Firebugs and Albert Camus’s The Just, focuses on American pop culture and attitudes a decade after the Al Qaeda attacks on the United States. This theatrical editorial promises to be one of the most irreverent, bombastic, and controversial examinations of American politics and culture to hit Denver audiences in years.

Mouse In A Jar

April 23 – May 29, 2010

An original work by Martyna Majok

We see a mother on a leash. We see the bruises. We smell the meat burn. We hear a crash, a thrash. We know the Man in Boots is coming. We know the daughter is out there. We know there is something scrounging in the shadows.Mouse in a Jar is a horror story packed full of oddities and underground life forms. This is Stockholm Syndrome. This is the impossible grace of bondage. This is subterranean punk; acts of desperation required.


Awards / Recognition

Best Actress in a Drama (Trina Magness), Westword

Actress in a Dramatic Role (Trina Magness) – Denver Post Ovation Award

Supporting Actress in a Dramatic Role (Kelleen Shadow) – Denver Post Ovation Award Nomination

Scenic Design (Nick Kargel) – Denver Post Ovation Award Nomination

Lighting Design (Steven J. Diedel) – Denver Post Ovation Award Nomination

Sound Design (Brian Freeland) – Denver Post Ovation Award Nomination

 

Press

Horror captured like a mouse in a jar, The Denver Post

LIDA presents, Mouse In A Jar, The Metropolitan 

‘Mouse in a Jar’ is not horror but it’s certainly scary, The Examiner

 

The Company

Direction
Julie Rada

Scenic Design
Nicholas Kargel

Lighting / Projection Design
Steven J. Deidel

Sound Design
Brian Freeland

Costumes
Annette Westerby

Properties
Julie Rada

Assistant Stage Direction
Lanie Reel

Associate Lighting Design
Anna R. Kaltenbach / Dan O’Neill

Video Foley Artist
Dan O’Neill

Production Run Crew
Ryan Gaddis / Jules DuMond / Kenny Storms


Ensemble (Order of Appearance)

Zosia
Janna Meiring

Daga
Kelleen Shadow

Ma
Trina Magness

Boy
Lorenzo Sariñana


Images

 

  • Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & 
Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Kelleen Shadow (Daga) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Kelleen Shadow (Daga) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Kelleen Shadow (Daga) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Kelleen Shadow (Daga) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma) & Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & 
Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Kelleen Shadow (Daga), Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & 
Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Kelleen Shadow (Daga), Lorenzo Sariñana (Boy) & Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma) & 
Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma) & Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Trina Magness (Ma). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
  • Janna Meiring (Zosia) & 
Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).
    Janna Meiring (Zosia) & Kelleen Shadow (Daga). Photo Erin Preston (2010).